800-827-0352

Microsoft to Soon Start Supporting ARM Chips

Sat, 04/26/2014 - 05:42 -- Karl

Reports suggest that Microsoft may depart from its reliance on Intel Corp’s chip technology. The software company may soon create a new system that does not require chip designs from Intel. Though Microsoft enjoys the top position in the PC operating systems market, it is currently facing stiff competition in other markets. The possibility that the company may release new software comes in the wake of this pressure from products in non PC markets (like smartphones and consumer tablets) by other leading manufacturers like Apple Inc. 

In the coming month, Microsoft could have a demonstration of the new version of its Windows operating system. This system is one that can work with devices consuming less power and supports chips based on Intel, Advanced Micro Devices Inc and ARM Holdings’ architecture. This Windows version is said to be designed to work with tablets and other devices using ARM processors. 

Currently Microsoft has a Windows version titled CE that functions with ARM chip designs, but these have been designed for embedded systems. The CE version can also run on Hitachi SuperH, x86 and MIPS. Another version of the Windows called Windows Embedded Compact 7 is designed for small devices like tablets. As result of this, it does not run well with fully enhanced versions of desktop OS. However, the new and still to be unveiled version of Windows from Microsoft is reported to be able to achieve this. 

While this innovative software will not be available for the next two years, Microsoft will reportedly conduct a discussion about it in January, at the Consumer Electronics Show. These reports also state that early this month Microsoft conducted a preview of its Windows 8 during the company’s keynote speech for the Consumer Electronics Show. 

When asked for a confirmation on these reports, Microsoft, Intel Corp and ARM Holdings refused to comment. 

To enquire about computer rental options for Windows and Mac based systems, contact Vernon Computer Source.